Typically, it takes 7 gallons of water to produce 1 gallon of beer. This quantity can rapidly increase to 10 gallons at less efficient breweries. Add to the remainder of the supply chain, such as the growth of barley and hop, and that amount rises to between 11 and 40 gallons of water per gallon of beer anywhere.

It is a staggering quantity, especially when many communities are affected by drought, natural disasters, and absence of access to clean water. The excellent news is that big and small breweries are working together to enhance procedures of water use.

Arizona Wilderness Brewing, working with Arizona’s Nature Conservancy, springs its barley from Hauser Farms. “Hauser Farms turned about 120 acres of the farm into barley and saved nearly 50 million gallons of water in just one season,” claims Nature.org.

Bear Republic produces 1 gallon of beer using only 3.5 gallons of water, making it one of the country’s most water-efficient breweries. In 2013, the brewery signed an agreement with Cloverdale to “front the town approximately half a million bucks so it can move forward with water well building, and in turn, the town will construct those wells quicker.

Blue Point teamed up with The Billion Oyster Project in September 2018 to assist the organisation achieve its objective of restoring New York Harbor 1 billion oysters by 2035. As part of the attempt, the brewery introduced Blue Point Good Reef Ale, a Belgian-style dry-hopped beer. For each beer sold, five oysters will be restored to oyster reefs in New York City; enough to filter up to 250 gallons of water.

In relation to its mermaid logo and nautical theme, with its Surfrider Summer Ale, Coronado Brewing is showing its gratitude for the ocean. The Surfrider Foundation, a non-profit organization devoted to “protecting and enjoying seas, waves and beaches,” benefits from sales.

In relation to its mermaid logo and nautical theme, with its Surfrider Summer Ale, Coronado Brewing is showing its gratitude for the ocean. The Surfrider Foundation, a non-profit organization devoted to “protecting and enjoying seas, waves and beaches,” benefits from sales.

With its warm water retrieval scheme, Full Sail Brewing saves more than 3 million gallons of water per year. It also has a water treatment plant on site that pre-treats water before it is sent to the treatment plant in the municipality, enhancing its performance. Furthermore, biosolids removed from water are provided to local farmers who use it for soil modification and fertilizer.

Finally, the attempts of Full Sail achieved a rarity in the sector: a water-to-beer ratio of three to one. “Because we are a tiny, autonomous brewery in a very competitive setting, we need to be sure that our company choices are accountable and cautious about our restricted resources,” said James Emmerson, executive brewmaster of Full Sail Brewing, to Pacific Standard in 2018.

And these are only a few of the hundreds of breweries taking on amazing initiatives globally. Check out the full article on beer waste water salvage by Vinepair here.

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